Pharoah, Bryant, Moulton headline CampusFest 2016

Clarion University’s University Activities Board hosted wholly comedic talent for CampusFest 2016. While some skipped out on the event due to the lack of musical talent, other students and the public alike enjoyed the performances of Saturday Night Live cast members Jay Pharoah and Aidy Bryant with opening act Collin Moulton.

Contributed Photo / The Clarion Call Comics Jay Pharoah and Aidy Bryant pose with the University Activities Board after CampusFest 2016.
Contributed Photo / The Clarion Call
Comics Jay Pharoah and Aidy Bryant pose with the University Activities Board after CampusFest 2016.

The Marwick-Boyd Auditorium on Friday night was filled with countless fits of laughter, racy jokes and audience interaction.  With a week off from SNL, Pharoah and Bryant shared personal experiences including dating advice and childhood traumas all with a comedic spin.

With less time for his material, Moulton was rapid-fire in his delivery.  He told jokes centered on his family and everyday intricacies like garage sales and the post office for the audience to relate to.

Moulton said that using interactions between himself and his parents, wife and kids is important in reaching out to the audiences.  Becoming engaged with his listeners has been an important staple in his 15-year-long career touring the country.

Contributed Photo / The Clarion Call Comedian Collin Moulton performed his stand-up at CampusFest on Friday.
Contributed Photo / The Clarion Call
Comedian Collin Moulton performed his stand-up at CampusFest on Friday.

“Your personality is in your stand-up,” said Moulton.  The same was true for his childhood.  He mentioned that the character of his mom that he describes on stage is actually a composite of both his own mom and his best friend’s growing up.

Moulton also expressed a desire to keep his material current.  While he did not mention it on stage at CampusFest, the comedian is creating material to talk about the recent passing of his father, who has consistently been fuel for many of Moulton’s jokes.

“You have to” work to stay current and relevant, Moulton mentioned.

At a successful point in his career, Moulton is also glad to be able to put his family first.  The comic has two kids with a third on the way.

“It’s easy for a comic,” said Moulton.  He no longer has to be away from his family weeks or months at a time.

Due to his hard work trying to get noticed early in his career, he feels more like a ‘cool uncle’ to his first child whereas he had more time to bond with his second kid.

Moulton described his journey as a typical career on the roads, going from club to club, until “you put your sh*t in her garage” and start a family.

A career in comedy was actually inspired by Moulton’s old girlfriend’s mother.  She mentioned that he try it, and that is when Moulton realized there were no special requirements to start a career in the industry.

“I feel unchained,” mentioned Moulton, who feels great in being able to be with his family consistently and use his fan following to power his career.  Now that he has earned fame and success in multiple television appearances and comedy tours, “I don’t clock in or clock out,” said Moulton.

Moulton said the trick to life is to not be beholden to anything but yourself and your loved ones.  He thinks that having too much of an obligation to work can seep into people’s personal lives and start to ruin personalities and lifestyles.

Working on yourself is one of the most important things according to Moulton.

The advice Moulton has for aspiring actors, comedians or entertainers is to “do it.”

Putting oneself out there will at least yield results, and Moulton says that it is crucial to learn from one’s mistakes and successes.

“You’ve got to try to fail,” stated Moulton.  If you do, you could end up like Moulton telling jokes about stuttering cops and predicting the future where kids cannot fathom the concept of post offices.

You May Also Like