Selfies warrant proper time, place to take

I don’t know about you, but the “art” of taking selfies is getting way out of control.

Selfies are when someone takes a picture of themselves.  It started with the bathroom selfie, typically a photo taken with the use of a mirror and displaying either a shower curtain or a toilet in the background.  Then came the duck face, where cute girls scrunched up their face and stick their lips out (so they look like a duck), thinking that this made them look attractive. 

Now, the new trend seems to be the fish gape where women have their mouth slightly hanging open, again thinking that this makes them look more attractive.  I’m sorry, but what is more attractive (on anyone) than a genuine smile?

Along with the ‘invention’ of the selfie comes the want to take selfies everywhere, including in settings or situations that may not be the smartest or the safest.  According to an article on hongkiat.com entitled “5 Best Examples of Why Selfies Can Be Dangerous (And Fatal),” a man was trampled by a bull attempting to take a selfie and fans put themselves and bicyclists in danger when attempting to take a selfie during the Tour de France.  Are selfies really worth dying for?

The article goes on to discuss five instances of selfie dangers.  The first is about a young Mexican named Oscar Otero Aguilar, who liked to taken selfies with guns and women. 

Aguilar attempted to take a gun selfie and did not realize the gun was loaded.  He ended up shooting himself; he died from his wound and his want to take a selfie.  Never play around with guns; this should not need to be said.

The next instance is the dilemma of taking selfies while driving.  Thirty-two year old Courtney Sanford was making her way to work one morning in North Carolina when she decided to take a selfie.  She often took selfies of herself while driving; the day in question, she was taking a selfie because her “happy song” was playing on the radio. 

She collided head-on with a truck and was killed instantly.  Not a happy moment at all.

Another incident involved two Spanish males, one 21 years of age and the other 16 years of age.  They decided to climb on top of a train car that was not being used.  The 21-year-old made the mistake of assuming that the cable had no electricity running to it, touched it, and was electrocuted and killed; the cable was a high-voltage wire.

Yet another incident speaks of a high school Russian female who wanted to capture a railroad selfie at night and decided to climb on top of a bridge.  She lost her footing and fell to her death.

Lastly, a young Polish married couple visited Portugal one holiday and decided to step over the barrier at a scenic cliff to take a selfie together.  They slipped and fell over the edge.  Dying from their selfie attempt, their 5-year-old and 6-year-old children are now being cared for by Polish diplomats.

So, after reading those tragic deaths over the want to get a selfie, do you really think the risk is worth it?  Are you willing to trade your life for the “ultimate” selfie?  I know I’m not; I’d rather experience life than try to document it dangerously.

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