Winter weather welcomes students back to campus

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]CLARION, Pa. – Clarion students have been welcomed back to campus with the bitter cold air that comes with winter.
On Sunday Jan. 26, Clarion’s high tempterature was 19 degrees.  With the additional wind chill, any soul brave enough to venture outside into the snowy wonderland, embraced a minus 20 degree temperature.
According to the National Weather Service, Clarion’s record low occurred in January 1963, crawling down to a painful negative 24 degrees. On Tuesday Jan. 7, Clarion came close to beating the record low, stopping short at minus 20 degrees.

What do students think about this weather? Many CU students claim that they knew that Clarion was known for its chilling weather, but didn’t realize just how cold the weather could be.

Students at Clarion attempt to keep warm while walking to class by bundling up in winter weather gear.
Students at Clarion attempt to keep warm while walking to class by bundling up in winter weather gear.

Emily Gammon has been noticing the cold weather. On heading back to her dorm Gannon said, “It’s so cold it literally hurts to go outside. My scarf and gloves have been my best friends this semester.”
She heads back to her dorm anticipating cozy blankets and hot coffee that, “always makes the trek back worth the weather though.”
When asked how students are surviving this bitter cold, Megan Anderson replies, “[wear] lots of layers and hot chocolate.”

Student Alex Elias adds, “Even in a jacket, gloves, scarf, and hat, I was freezing. I was slipping and sliding all week.”
Some students have gone to great lengths to avoid the bipolar fits of Mother Nature.
Second semester freshman Flora Jean Madison switched three of her five classes to online lectures. Madison said, “I can stay inside the warmth. I like it that I can do whatever. I figured for each semester when it’s cold I’ll do a lot of online classes.”

Snow rollers have been appearing across areas of Pennsylvania.  The snow rollers are caused by small pieces of snow being rolled by the wind.  As the snow rolls, it picks up other materials causing it to grow inside, similar to making a snowman.  The inside of the snow rollers is caused by snow that gets blown away, causing a hole in the middle.
Snow rollers have been appearing across areas of Pennsylvania. The snow rollers are caused by small pieces of snow being rolled by the wind. As the snow rolls, it picks up other materials causing it to grow inside, similar to making a snowman. The inside of the snow rollers is caused by snow that gets blown away, causing a hole in the middle.

Student Kayla Dulick believes that “enduring it day-to-day gets old. The cold weather makes going outside to walk to classes even more dreadful.”

 

Faculty at the university has also been taking notice of the cold temperatures outside. Nurse Practitioner Gretchen Bishop, who works at Keeling Health Center said, “The main concern that many teachers have been noticing is that students are

not covering up. Protecting your head, and wearing gloves is crucial in this cold. If any student needs a set of hat or gloves, they are being distributed at Egbert in Room 128 for free.”
Bishop further explained that this is the peak of influenza season, “The Center still has flu shots available for students who want to protect themselves.”

Bishop described the warning signs of hypothermia, which range from shivering, impaired judgment, drowsiness or weak pulse.

“The best way to avoid getting sick or developing hypothermia is to just cover up and stay warm, practice good hand washing, and only go outside if you need to,” said Bishop.
For more information about hypothermia, its symptoms, precautions, or first aide care, visit www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypothermia.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_facebook type=”standard”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/2″][vc_tweetmeme type=”horizontal”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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